Monthly Archives: September 2013

Daily Telegraph (Hrsg.): How historical figures would have looked today

Famous faces from history including William Shakespeare, Henry VIII and Horatio Nelson have been given a modern makeover to see how they would look if they were alive today.The project, comissioned by history TV channel Yesterday to celebrate its new series, the Secret Life Of..., saw digital artists working closely with history experts to ensure the portraits gave a real sense of how historical characters would look if they were alive in the 21st Century. ABOVE: ADMIRAL LORD NELSONA Vice Admiral and dedicated navy officer Nelson is dressed in a modern naval uniform.In today's Navy, Nelson would spend more time deskbound and as such he would have gained a little weight which is reflected in the portrait.To replace the right arm lost after being wounded in battle, he has been given a prosthetic to wear.The Victoria Cross wasn't available during his time but had they been in existence, he would have qualified.

 Famous faces from history including William Shakespeare, Henry VIII and Horatio Nelson have been given a modern makeover to see how they would look if they were alive today.

The project, comissioned by history TV channel Yesterday to celebrate its new series, the Secret Life Of…, saw digital artists working closely with history experts to ensure the portraits gave a real sense of how historical characters would look if they were alive in the 21st Century.

ABOVE: ADMIRAL LORD NELSON

A Vice Admiral and dedicated navy officer, Nelson is dressed in a modern naval uniform.

In today’s Navy, Nelson would spend more time deskbound and as such he would have gained a little weight which is reflected in the portrait.

To replace the right arm lost after being wounded in battle, he has been given a prosthetic to wear.

The Victoria Cross wasn’t available during his time but had they been in existence, he would have qualified.

Picture: Yesterday

The artworks, which took three months to create, were created under the watchful eye of award-winning academic, author and historian Dr Suzannah Lipscomb to ensure the new artworks accurately reflect how the historical figures might look in 2013. ABOVE: WILLIAM SHAKESPEAREDaring and forward thinking hipster Shakespeare has been fashioned as a 'modern day playwright' with his edgy Shoreditch shirt and waistcoat look.He has been given piercings on both ears, leaving questions about his sexuality unanswered.An actor as well as a playwright, Shakespeare might have taken advantage of modern-day hair transplanting techniques to sport a full head of hair like numerous celebrity actors.

The artworks, which took three months to create, were created under the watchful eye of award-winning academic, author and historian Dr Suzannah Lipscomb to ensure the new artworks accurately reflect how the historical figures might look in 2013.

 

ABOVE: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Daring and forward thinking hipster Shakespeare has been fashioned as a ‘modern day playwright’ with his edgy Shoreditch shirt and waistcoat look.

He has been given piercings on both ears, leaving questions about his sexuality unanswered.

An actor as well as a playwright, Shakespeare might have taken advantage of modern-day hair transplanting techniques to sport a full head of hair like numerous celebrity actors.

Picture: Yesterday

Dr Lipscomb leaned heavily on the insight gained from the Secret Life Of... series, which delves deep into the lives of historical figures and dishes the dirt on their hitherto unexplored secret lives.Each modern day recreation provides an incredible insight into what some of the most revered figures in history would look like, had they lived in today's society complete with cosmetic surgery, pearly white teeth, and the latest fashion wear. ABOVE: HENRY VIIIRenowned for being vain and lavish, King Henry has been given white veneers and hair plugs to hide his balding head.Known to flaunt his wealth, is now out of his voluminous puffed sleeve velvet gown and in a tailored designer black suit, wearing a sparkling diamond ring and designer watch.Instead of the cotton shirt fastened up to the chin he now sports an unbuttoned shirt Simon Cowell style and is very much the 'modern day lady killer'.An avid sportsman and known for being conceited he has been slimmed down. Henry's vanity would have ensured he would have retained the naturally muscly, rugby-player type figure he had in his youth.Known for having spent a lot of time outdoors riding, hunting, and playing tennis, Henry VIII has also been given a tan.Henry has exchanged his uncomfortable flat footed shoes for modern shoes with a heel.

r Lipscomb leaned heavily on the insight gained from the Secret Life Of… series, which delves deep into the lives of historical figures and dishes the dirt on their hitherto unexplored secret lives.

Each modern day recreation provides an incredible insight into what some of the most revered figures in history would look like, had they lived in today’s society complete with cosmetic surgery, pearly white teeth, and the latest fashion wear.

 

ABOVE: HENRY VIII

Renowned for being vain and lavish, King Henry has been given white veneers and hair plugs to hide his balding head.

Known to flaunt his wealth, is now out of his voluminous puffed sleeve velvet gown and in a tailored designer black suit, wearing a sparkling diamond ring and designer watch.

Instead of the cotton shirt fastened up to the chin he now sports an unbuttoned shirt Simon Cowell style and is very much the modern day lady killer.

An avid sportsman and known for being conceited he has been slimmed down. Henry’s vanity would have ensured he would have retained the naturally muscly, rugby-player type figure he had in his youth.

Known for having spent a lot of time outdoors riding, hunting, and playing tennis, Henry VIII has also been given a tan.

Henry has exchanged his uncomfortable flat footed shoes for modern shoes with a heel.

Picture: Yesterday

AVOVE: MARIE ANTOINETTEHer three-foot tall hair has been let down and her unusually high forehead concealed with a trendy fringe.Known for her crooked teeth in her youth she has been given a full modern-day orthodontic treatment.Teased for her small breasts as a teenager, she has been given breast implants.Known for being fashionable and changing clothes three times a day, Marie Antoinette is dressed in a modern designer dress. Reported to express how she was feeling through the accessories in her wig, she is wearing a flirty Philip Treacey style hat.Her modern day portrait also shows the her fully-made up in colourful make-up.

AVOVE: MARIE ANTOINETTE

Her three-foot tall hair has been let down and her unusually high forehead concealed with a trendy fringe.

Known for her crooked teeth in her youth she has been given a full modern-day orthodontic treatment.

Teased for her small breasts as a teenager, she has been given breast implants.

Known for being fashionable and changing clothes three times a day, Marie Antoinette is dressed in a modern designer dress. Reported to express how she was feeling through the accessories in her wig, she is wearing a flirty Philip Treacey style hat.

Her modern day portrait also shows the her fully-made up in colourful make-up.

Picture: Yesterday

ABOVE: Elizabeth IA powerful no-nonsense female leader, Elizabeth might have straightened her hair in a powerful yet stylish short cropped style.Known for her love of fashion, she would be more likely to wear a bespoke stylish and unique female suit made with rich colours and material.Rarely pictured smiling, Queen Elizabeth exudes power in the modern day portrait, and hides her new veneers purchased to disguise her notoriously bad teeth.

ABOVE: Elizabeth I

A powerful no-nonsense female leader, Elizabeth might have straightened her hair in a powerful yet stylish short cropped style.

Known for her love of fashion, she would be more likely to wear a bespoke stylish and unique female suit made with rich colours and material.

Rarely pictured smiling, Queen Elizabeth exudes power in the modern day portrait, and hides her new veneers purchased to disguise her notoriously bad teeth.

Picture: Yesterday

via The Telegraph,

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Brad Blumer (2013) Expensive batteries are holding back electric cars. Can that change?

One of the big reasons why electric cars have been slow to catch on is that batteries are still hugely expensive — usually around $12,000 to $15,000, or one-third the price of the vehicle — and can provide only limited range.

So, will these batteries ever get better? That’s the big question. Some analysts are deeply skeptical that improvement will be quick or easy. In the newest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Fred Schlacter hasan essay on why batteries are fundamentally different from things like mobile phones or computers:

The public has become accustomed to rapid progress in mobile phone technology, computers … These developments are due in part to the ongoing exponential increase in computer processing power, doubling approximately every 2 years for the past several decades. This pattern is usually called Moore’s Law and is named for Gordon Moore, a cofounder of Intel.

Now here’s the bad news. “There is no Moore’s Law for batteries,” Schlacter says:

The reason there is a Moore’s Law for computer processors is that electrons are small and they do not take up space on a chip. Chip performance is limited by the lithography technology used to fabricate the chips; as lithography improves ever smaller features can be made on processors.

Batteries are not like this. Ions, which transfer charge in batteries, are large, and they take up space, as do anodes, cathodes, and electrolytes. A D-cell battery stores more energy than an AA-cell. Potentials in a battery are dictated by the relevant chemical reactions, thus limiting eventual battery performance. Significant improvement in battery capacity can only be made by changing to a different chemistry.

Scientists and battery experts, who have been optimistic in the recent past about improving lithium-ion batteries and about developing new battery chemistries—lithium/air and lithium/sulfur are the leading candidates—are considerably less optimistic now.

So that’s the pessimistic case. Batteries will continue to be a serious limitation for electric vehicles unless we get dramatic new breakthroughs in battery chemistry.

But is Schlacter being too gloomy? On Twitter, Ramez Naam pointed me to a 2009study finding that lithium-ion batteries have made some significant strides in the past two decades, with energy density rising and prices falling.* (That said, the rate of improvement appears to be slowing toward the end):

lithium ion

Meanwhile, the truly optimistic analysts will argue that even incremental tweaks can yield dramatic results. So perhaps there’s no need for Moore’s Law-style gains. A 2012 analysis from McKinsey & Co., for instance, predicted that the price for lithium-ion batteries could fall by as much as two-thirds by 2020, down to around $200 per kilowatt-hour.

All that’s needed, the McKinsey report argued, is slow, steady improvement: As new factories come online to produce more and more batteries, economies of scale will drive down the price. So will a reduction in the cost of components, as well as smaller technical advances in cathodes and electrolytes that increase the capacity of batteries.

And if battery prices do fall below the $250/kwh mark, as the McKinsey researchers expect to happen within the next decade, then suddenly electric vehicles make a lot more financial sense, even with gas prices at their current levels. The economics shift drastically:

This chart sums up the basic situation: The overall cost of batteries will go a long way to determining how quickly electric vehicles gain in popularity. But the much, much harder question is whether big, long-shot chemical breakthroughs are the only thing that will get us there, or whether smaller steps might do the trick.

—–

Note: It’s worth clarifying something that commenter perkinisms notes — the rate of improvement in lithium-ion battery energy density appears to be largely linear, while the improvement in computer processing power has been exponential. Batteries aren’t improving quite as fast.

via Brad Plumer (2013) In Washington Post, online eidtion 02.04.2013

 

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